My kind of crazy

Kind of Crazy or Kind of Scared?

Have you ever heard or said the phrase, “They’re my kind of crazy”? For some reason, my brain has fixated on this phrase for the last week and, as such, I have felt driven to write in order to examine it. What the heck does it mean? Is the person clinically insane, or just strange or weird in some agreeable way? Perhaps they maintain a collection of exotic butters?

To put the phrase in my own context: I typically say it to a close friend while having a great time with others, or while watching a video or performance that is perhaps just on the edge of being socially acceptable. You know—one of those “hilarious, but not something I’d ever show my parents” kind of things. “They’re my kind of crazy,” to me, means someone has a similar mindset and is just one or two steps ahead of me, either in terms of thought process or of courage. I want to be like them because of the abilities they have or way they think.

It is so easy to admire others…or even be jealous of what they have that we don’t, and I have spent so much time training myself to not be jealous, but to funnel that energy towards attaining the things I admire in others. For the skeptics among my readers, I will tell you a little story about how I got to that point. In my early college years, I was a lump. Not because I stayed indoors without human interaction, playing video games (although that’s mainly what I did), but because I didn’t do anything to try to improve my life and be happier. I should have been as green as the wicked witch from all the envy I had for the “normal humans” who seemed to effortlessly enjoy life, but I never took the time to find out why they enjoyed life. I never even took the time to figure out why my life sucked in the first place! I refused to.

It was not something I wanted to deal with.

Long story short, my life reached a rock-bottom point where I was forced to look at myself and the pit I had dug. And yes, in my case, the pit was dug by yours truly; I didn’t just fall into it, because it was the culmination of a lot of complicated things I could have influenced. At that point, I realized that I didn’t have a kind of crazy to be drawn to, I was crazy. Crazy enough to let myself slip to that point.

We all have our skeletons—some scarier than others, and some less controllable than others. In any case, a bit of observation and retrospection can lead to some life changing-epiphanies. I encourage you to find a journal or legal pad or some writing surface (yes, I mean writing by hand, because writing engages the brain in ways a computer can’t) and just write out a list of what’s on your mind – good or bad. Did a coworker annoy you today? Write it down. Was your lunch extra tasty? Write it down. Worst or best day of your week, month, year? Write it down. Has something been nagging at your brain for weeks? Yup, you guessed it! That’s it. That’s the whole exercise. You don’t have to do anything else unless you feel like it.

The act of writing thoughts down gets our brain to engage with them, both consciously and subconsciously, which sets gears in motion to move you from wherever you are to a better place. Our subconscious developed to keep us safe, and when you take even the tiny moments to recognize things that are bad, it will start to take notice. Now, I’m not saying that this exercise will change your life overnight. Few things, short of winning the lottery or getting hit by a bus, will do something that drastic. However, if you do this with some regularity, you may start to notice small things changing for the better. In my humble opinion, small, incremental changes, whether good or bad, lead to far less chaos and far more stability than big, abrupt changes.

For those of you that want faster change or are just over-achievers, here’s your extra credit: once you’ve written your list (or word cloud—it doesn’t have to be neat and orderly as long as things are on paper), pick one or two thoughts from the page and spend some more time on them. Think about how those things affect you and, in turn, how you can affect them. Then start doing something about it! Few things change the way we want them to without our direct interaction.

So. What’s your kind of crazy?

Posted by Curious

He is the crazy mastermind behind coaching/consulting practice Protagonist and serves as lead Valor Consultant. With his sharp mind, specialized training, and deep empathy, he guides others toward what they really want out of life . . . and has fun with them along the way. Life should be fun, after all! Curious is also a serial entrepreneur who centers his projects on bettering the lives of others.

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